Moving Your Pets Print

 

Moving Your Pets 
Moving with pets can be stressful for them too. You’re running around doing other-than-normal things and they usually can sense this change in you.  For the best advice on how to keep their stress at a minimum and make their move more comfortable, it is best to seek the advice of your veterinarian.  And while you’re there, it wouldn’t hurt to get a jump on requesting a copy of veterinary records, a rabies vaccination certificate, and a health certificate for the move. 
 
See if your vet can recommend another in your new location.  If your pet has special needs, ask your vet for the best way to manage those needs during the move.  If you have experienced behavioral issues with your pet in the past, now might be a good time to find someone who specializes in animal behavior to learn how to manage your pet before, during, and after the move.  Again, your veterinarian will be able to refer you. 
 
Renting With Pets? 
Still looking for a pet-friendly rental?  The Humane Society of the United States (www.hsus.org) has helpful information for you and your pet including finding a new, pet-friendly home. 
 
I.D. Tags & Leashes 
If you haven’t done so already, get I.D. tags and leashes for your pets – even if your pets stay indoors.  The tags should have your new address and phone number (and/or cell phone number should something happen while traveling) on them and be sure your pet is wearing it while moving.  Yes, a leash for your cat.  You’ll need it if you are taking a long trip (kitty will have to stretch eventually too) and for those first few days your pet goes outdoors in the new neighborhood. 
 
Leading Up to the Day of the Move 
Choose a room to be the “pet room” and create an environment or “‘safe haven” for them.  Move food and water bowls, toys, and other favorite objects of theirs into this room. Post a sign to the door that reads “Pets: Do Not Open” that friends or movers can see it easily.  If moving pets via a pet carrier, put the carrier in the room with them – door open – so they are familiar and more comfortable with it the day of the move.  Also consider asking a friend or family member to care for your pet(s) during the moving process. More than likely, your pet is familiar with them already.  Of course, you could consider boarding your dog or cat. 
 
Basic Checklist for Your Pet 
Below is a basic list of needs to pack for your pet.  Certainly, if your pet has special needs, you will need to include those allowances in this list. 
 
You may also download this checklist by clicking here.

Gather Completed
Veterinary records, certificates, and recent photos  
Medications  
Your pets' usual foods and plenty of water from the home you're leaving (changing their water source can be disorienting and upset their stomachs)  
Food and water bowls, a can opener, and resealable lids  
Toys, chew bones, and treats  
Leashes for cats and dogs  
Beds (pillows, towels, crate liners, or other crate liner materials)  
Plastic bags and scoops for dogs  
Litter box for cats  
Cage covers for birds or rodents  
Reptilian supplies, heat rocks, lamps, food, water sources, etc.  
Paper towels and cleaner for messes  
Provisions for the first day at the new home  
OTHER:  
   
   
   

Again, the best advice is to consult with your veterinarian.

 

Domestic and International Information Regarding Animals 
Animal Care is an organization charged with enforcing the United States Dept. of Agriculture’s Animal Welfare Act (AWA).  
The Animal Care website offers basic information on domestic and international travel of common pets and other animals.  The site offers a “Tips and Facts” section and many helpful links leading to information on individual state requirements, airline requirements, CDC information, and international regulations.
 
To search regulations by state, please visit the U. S. individual State Regulations: http://www.aphis.usda.gov/wps/portal/aphis/home/
 
The Northern Fairfield County Association of Realtors® (NFCAR) offers this information strictly as a guide to assist in the task of residential moving.  Under no terms may NFCAR, it's Board of Directors, staff, nor membership may be held responsible nor liable for any inaccuracies, complications, or problems associated with your move, contracts, or transactions.